Best reasons why people not become expert in Linux

How did you become a Linux expert and what advice do you have for those starting out?
I’ve used Linux on my personal computers since as early as 1995 or 1996 and started working with Linux professionally in 1999. I was immediately drawn to Linux. It was love at first sight for me.

The Linux design and philosophy made total sense to me, and I wanted to learn everything I could about it.

I started using Linux daily and set out to get a job using Linux. Since then I’ve used Linux in almost every type of situation imaginable: at large well-known corporations, at small privately owned companies, at a startup, at a security firm, at an airline, and at a university supporting researchers.

I’ve run Linux on hardware, in virtual machines, in containers, and in the cloud. I’ve done so many things with Linux it’s hard to list them all.

Also Read: The best course on Linux

Why many people fail to learn Linux

  1. My advice to those who are starting out is to use your time wisely.
  2. I see so many people wasting precious time searching for free videos and reading random blog posts trying to cobble together their own Linux curriculum.
  3. The result is usually hours, days, or even months spent learning unrelated bits and pieces with no clear structure and no real progress to show for their work.
  4. I highly recommend taking a course that uses a logical and systematic approach so you learn things in an order that makes sense. This way you can build upon your knowledge.
  5. Another common mistake is spending a lot of time trying to find the “perfect” Linux distribution and worrying about the choice. It’s way more important that you just start learning Linux. Linux is Linux at the core, and the concepts you learn when starting out apply to every Linux distribution. Pick one and get started!
Advertisements

Author: Srini

Experienced software developer. Skills in Development, Coding, Testing and Debugging. Good Data analytic skills (Data Warehousing and BI). Also skills in Mainframe.